Spring Trip: Langlais Sculpture Preserve in Cushing, ME

The Special Events Committee has arranged a visit to the Langlais Sculpture Preserve in Cushing on Tuesday, May 8, followed by lunch on our own at the charming Thomaston Cafe, just 3 miles away.

Maine native Bernard Langlais, best known locally as the artist who created the 62-foot wooden Abenaki Indian sculpture in Skowhegan, lived his last 11 years in Cushing where he populated his 90 acres with hundreds of wooden sculptures of animals and people he created with an ax, chainsaw, and hand tools. The Langlais estate containing thousands of art works, land, and his homestead in Cushing was given to Colby College’s Art Museum in 2010 after his death. Through combined efforts over five years by Colby College Art Museum, the Kohler Foundation and the Georges River Land Trust, the Langlais Sculpture Park was created, and now is owned by Georges River Land Trust. The tour will take us to see 12 larger-than-life restored wooden sculptures, Langlais’ workshop, and his homestead, all connected on five acres by a wheelchair friendly path.

The menagerie features a gigantic Richard Nixon rising from a swamp, a playful elephant sculpture with food an elephant eats painted on the inside of the structure, and a wooden likeness of Andrew Wyeth’s “Christina.” Langlais’ woodworking studio will also be toured, where you can see his creative space including wooden mallets, tools and wood shavings on the workbench seemingly as he left them.

We will meet at the lower Hutchinson Center parking lot at 8:30 a.m. and carpool to Cushing. There is no charge for this trip, except the cost of your lunch. Trip registration forms will be available in the Senior College office, on the outside of the office door, and on line. Registration ends on April 30.

For more information, please call Martha Laitin at 323-2368 or email her at marthalaitin@yahoo.com.

Download registration form.

We hope you can join us!


Future Special Events